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Division of Psychoanalysis (Division 39)
American Psychological Association

Empirical Studies in Psychoanalysis

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Many Division 39 members have been reporting increasing incidences of exasperating encounters with academic psychologists, biological psychiatrists, non-psychoanalytic clinicians, insurance company personnel, pharmaceutical industry representatives, government bureaucrats, and prospective clients who claim that psychoanalytic ways of working are not "evidence-based." Andrew Gerber has developed a web site for the American Psychoanalytic Association describing, and organizing under topic headings, studies that meet rigorous standards of scientific research and provide empirical evidence for the value of psychodynamic ideas. APsaA has graciously arranged for our members to access that site via the following link.

Empirical Studies in Psychoanalysis

Despite a paucity of randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs), which are expensive and difficult to conduct well (particularly with long-term, individualized treatments oriented toward structural as well as symptomatic change), there exists a solid and growing body of respectable scientific evidence for psychoanalytic approaches. It is our hope that by reference to these studies, Division members who are encountering the facile assumption that there is no empirical support for psychoanalysis can be better prepared to defend their work. Those who train therapists or who work in organizations where there is pressure to provide "only evidence-based treatments" may find this link particularly helpful.

News posted: Nov 01, 2008


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